Mom Burnout: We've all been there, but we can move through it

It's real and it's brutal: Mom Burnout. It creeps up on us a little bit at a time and, before we know it, we are consumed by it. We enter motherhood with an idealized vision of what life will be like, and in many ways motherhood is more beautiful and more amazing than we ever could have imagined. But in many ways it is more challenging and draining, more exhausting and depleting, than we ever could have imagined. After sleepless nights, the demands around the house, and day after day of constantly nurturing everyone else except ourselves, we find ourselves at the end of our ropes. This is Mom Burnout.

When mom is burnt out, everyone feels it: the words are harsher, the sighs are louder, the smiles are fewer. Suddenly everything in the home feels stressful and nothing runs smoothly. Mothers are pivotal, we are an anchor for the house and the family. When this anchor starts to lose its grip, the entire ship begins to drift away.

But these demands aren't going anywhere. Babies may sleep and they may not. Toddlers may wake up happy and they may not. Children may agreeably eat their dinner and they may not. So how do we notice the signs of Mom Burnout before we are consumed, before we are completely depleted? There are things we can do, things that can help us dig our anchor in just a bit deeper.

1. Speak up. Ask for help. Do not hold it in. Ask your spouse, your family, your friends, your neighbor. Reach out to support groups. Remember that it takes an entire tribe, a whole village, the community to raise a child. Reach out and connect. Help is a beautiful thing. Don't be afraid of it.

2. Release the pressure. Stop comparing. Our society has created this idea of a mother who has it all under control, every single day, without any help: a clean house, smart and obedient children, organic meals made from scratch, a never-fading smile, a sweet and gentle voice, and she showered, brushed her teeth and put on heels today. I haven't met this mother yet, not the one who pulls this off every day and on her own. The pressure to become this mother is heavy, so just release it. Stop comparing yourself to other moms. We all have our own challenges and mountains to climb. Let's climb together instead of trying to reach the top first. (Hint: There is no top.)

3. Take breaths, deep breaths, and root down in the moment. Motherhood is constant and it keeps us on our toes. So breathe, take moments to be where you are, exactly where you are. Be present in motherhood, even throughout the challenges. The inhale and the exhale will carry us through the struggles and allow us to experience what motherhood is handing us. We hold so much more strength than we ever could have imagined. And thank goodness for that!

4. Nourish yourself, really and truly. Schedule time. Make time. Demand a morning, a day, a weekend. Motherhood will empty your cup, and filling up your own cup will only give you more to offer those around you. So make it a priority. Make YOU a priority. One of the best things we can do for our kids is to take care of ourselves. Don't spend so much time and energy on everyone else that you forget yourself. You are important.

mom and baby yoga mom burnout

The 8 Limbs of Yoga in Motherhood: Pranayama

On our journey up the 8 Limbs of Yoga in Motherhood, the next limb we come to is Pranayama, but we'll call it PranaMama since we're bringing this all back to motherhood. Prana is breath, it's the life force, the constant inhale and exhale that brings energy to our being. Pranayama(Mama) is the control or regulation of this breath, often through exercises and specific techniques. This simple practice, this holds so much power, and it is a great tool for mothers!

Our breath is beautiful. It can be nourishing and energizing, bringing vitality to our bodies and clarity to our minds. Motherhood is beautiful too. But it a can feel depleting at times, leaving us exhausted and drained. Our prana is a guiding light out of this darkness and back into the light. Just like when we practice yoga, in motherhood we must also continue to come back to this powerful breath. We must acknowledge when the tides of motherhood are carrying us out too deep, and return to our inhale and exhale to feel grounded, supported and strong once again.

We walk through our days with shallow inhales and exhales that are cut short. We forget about this thing we have called breath, and we ignore the strength we can draw from it. The hours fly by and the days tumble into each other. We are scrambling to keep up and to be the best mothers we can be. It's so easy to forget to take time for this beautiful thing called breath. But we must.

So sit down mama. Relax the muscles your jaw. Draw your shoulder blades just slightly closer on your back. Breathe in through your nose and feel the cool air travel in through your nostrils. Feel your lungs expand completely, your belly rising. Embrace that fullness.

Pause at the top of that inhale. Can you sip in just a bit more? Now pause again.

Now move into the exhale. Releasing the air back out through your nose. Feel your belly release, your lungs emptying fully as the last of the warm air leaves your nostrils. Embrace that emptiness.

Pause at the bottom of that exhale. Can you release just a bit more? Now pause again.

Repeat if you like. Notice the shifts.

Draw strength from this practice of PranaMama. Feel grounded and supported. Welcome in that clarity and peace. We can all use a bit more of this in our lives. Now venture back out into that world of motherhood, and know that these inhales and exhales are always here, right here, when you need them.

Mom and Baby Pranayama

5 Ways to Practice Ahimsa in Motherhood

We recently took a deep dive into the Mama Yamas, which make up the first limb, the foundation of the 8 Limbs of Yoga in Motherhood. There are 5 of them, so it was a lot of information to digest. But now that you have the high-level view of the Mama Yamas, we are going to spend the next week focusing on incorporating them into our lives, working them into motherhood one at a time. Because talking (or reading) about guidelines and practices is only part of the process, now it’s time to build these into our days as we move towards a more mindful approach to motherhood.

Beginning with the first Mama Yama, Ahimsa, which means non-harming and non-violence, here are 5 ways to weave this into your day and hopefully, eventually your life.

  1. Harm and violence manifest in many ways in our daily lives, and so often this is directed at ourselves. So often the most painful dialogue takes place within our own minds, directed inwardly. But before we can truly make mindful shifts in life, we first need to be aware of what we are shifting. So this week, be aware. Just be aware. Listen to the words you are speaking to yourself. Hear what it is that you say when you look in the mirror, when you make a mistake, when you feel like you fall short of your expectations. Just listen. Tune in. Be aware.
  2. And this internal dialogue also flows out to those around us. So this week, also be mindful of the words you speak. Be mindful of the intentions behind those words. Be aware of the negativity, the passive aggression, the hurt that likes to creep into our messages. Negativity spreads so quickly, but so does positivity. Spread positivity. Spread love. Begin with your words.
  3. Mothers so often harm themselves, completely unintentionally. In our quest to love those around us, to provide for them any and everything, we often neglect to do the same for ourselves. And this happens over and over, day after day. And then this becomes a habit. And then this becomes the norm. And then our entire self is being poured into those around us and nothing is coming back to fill us up again. Soon the well runs dry. This week, allow yourself to make yourself a priority. Start with something simple. Demand 10 minutes a day to do what you want. Read. Write. Walk. Sit in silence. Fill yourself back up again. Soon this will become a habit. Then it becomes the norm. Then you are filling yourself up, over and over again, and you have so much more to give.
  4. Every time we choose to eat, we are making a decision regarding Ahimsa, but rarely do we even notice it. Every time we buy food at the grocery store or cook dinner, we have an opportunity to practice non-harming. Food is the fuel that we live off of. As mothers, we are often so involved in this decision for our families. What are we eating? What are we feeding them? How is this nourishing us? How is this harming us? Be aware. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself, but at least begin to be aware of the decisions you are making here. So much of this can become auto pilot, bring awareness back into this. Make these decisions consciously. As you choose food this week, be aware. Notice your habits here. Notice how and why you are making the decisions you are.
  5. Find movement. This body is miraculous. It carries us through our days and provides for us in ways we don’t even notice. But it was made to move. These muscles want to reach and stretch. These joints want to bend. These bones don’t want to sit in stillness for too long. Bring movement back into your life in a way that nourishes your body. And move with your little ones. Let their little bodies stretch and roll and twist and move. If we make this a part of our days and then our lives, it becomes a part of theirs too. This week find 5 minutes each day to move with your little one. Dance to a song, run down the sidewalk, do yoga, play at the park, crawl through the grass. Anything, but do it once a day.

As you begin to weave this into your days, notice any changes, any shifts. Moving away from harm and violence into a life of Ahimsa requires effort. It means we have to shift our routines and change our habits. It means we have to find different ways to view the world and those around us. But it also means that we become a channel of love and peace, and that, after all, is such an important piece of navigating through motherhood consciously and mindfully.

Ahimsa in Motherhood

The 8 Limbs of Yoga in Motherhood

I remember sitting in my yoga teacher training years ago and learning about the 8 limbs of yoga. I found this approach to living a conscious, mindful existence to be refreshing and grounding. It expanded my idea of what yoga was and exploded the possibilities of how yoga could be a part of my life. I committed to fully exploring each limb and weaving them into my existence.

And then I had a child and everything changed. My time on the mat was reduced to a few minutes a day, maybe even just a few minutes a week. My reading material went from books that enriched my soul, to scouring the internet for quick tips on mothering: What should a breastfeeding mother eat? Will I ever sleep again? Are there any meals I can make in 2 minutes? It was survival mode folks.

But one day I was walking past my dusty shelf of long neglected books. Pablo Coehlo was flagging me down. Irving Stone looked at me with disappointment. Even Jane Austen was taunting me. And then I saw my yoga books and I thought surely I had some time to skim a few pages between diapers and tummy time. I randomly opened to a page that discussed the 8 limbs of yoga, the 8 components to living a meaningful and purposeful life. I recalled my dedication to these limbs in my past life as a non-mom and wondered how they fit into my life as a mother. Surely I still wanted to live a meaningful and purposeful life, perhaps now even more than before.

And so began my quest for the 8 limbs of yoga in motherhood. Yoga changed my life 10 years ago and reshaped the way I viewed myself and the world around me. It has been profound for me in many ways. And surely I would want to carry this into my life as a mother. Being a mother has brought new meaning and purpose to my life, but along with that has come the hardest challenges and deepest struggles. As a mother, if ever there was a time for living a conscious and mindful existence, this is truly it.

So stay tuned in the next few weeks as we take a deep dive into The 8 Limbs of Yoga as they pertain to Motherhood. We’ll take on the Yamas, the Niyamas, Dhyana, even Samadhi and much more. Are these words new to you? If yes, that’s totally ok. Really, it is. I’ll walk you through them. Hopefully this journey will support your motherhood journey, lift you up, shift your perspective, challenge you, inspire you, whatever it is that you need right now as a mom. Or perhaps it won’t. And that’s ok too. But for me, this has provided a framework for motherhood. This has been the bridge between my identity as a yogi and my identity as a mother. It’s been eye-opening, inspiring, grounding. I hope you find a piece of this too.

Stay tuned…

Melissa Kushnaryov, Co-Founder Seed & Song

Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana with Baby

There is the Dark and the Light, in Motherhood too

My two year old daughter has recently become fascinated with light. She loves flashlights and the lights on our Christmas tree. She especially loves those little battery operated candles that you can switch on and off. The other morning she grabbed one of these candles and switched it on. When it didn't shine brightly she looked at me and said "this one isn't working". I explained to her that it was working if you look closely but that we can really see the light of the candles when it is dark. 

As we approach the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year, we are enveloped in more darkness than usual. The earth reminds us of the need for dark, of shadow, waiting, and stillness. 

While the earth is darker, we adorn our homes with light. Whether it is with lights on our Christmas tree, candles on the Hanukkah menorah, or the light of a fire we gather around. This season is full of dark and light. 

And so it is with our souls and our hearts. Especially as mothers, we daily experience dark and light. There are the sleepless nights, the fears and the complete frustration. And then there is the purest joy, love and sweetness. We are made of shadow and light. Our lives are made of dark and light. They both hold lessons and gifts for us and our children. 

 

How can we lean into darkness and see its hidden gifts? How can we approach the shadows without fear, knowing they also reveal the light? This season offers us an invitation into this mystery.  

Thriving in Motherhood: Find your Mom Circle

It’s simple: mothers need other mothers. If you’re already a mother, you may already know this. But if you’re a new mother, expecting or just beginning to plan, this simple truth may be one of motherhood’s best kept secrets. We women are strong, resilient and determined. We take pride in being self-reliant and capable. We will take on motherhood with the same determination and strength that we’ve used in the rest of our lives. But we don’t have to do it alone and we shouldn’t do it alone. We aren’t expected to. It takes a village to raise a child, this is certainly true. But your village must include other mothers, because they enrich your village in ways no one else can. They are one of your bests assets in surviving and thriving the beautiful chaos of motherhood. We all know motherhood is a journey. It’s a gift and a blessing. But it can be hard and lonely and scary and unknown and uncertain and so tough at times.

But other moms, they get it. They give you strength, support, empathy, opinions, stories, assurance, laughs, cries and love. They truly understand what you’re living each day and they can help you through in a way no one else can.

So get out there. Seek out your mom group, find your sister circle. Go beyond connecting in the digital world. Find a moms group in your community. Sign up for mom and baby classes. Go to meet up groups. Go to the park. Introduce yourself. Start to find your tribe, form your support group, create your mom circle. It is most definitely one of the keys to thriving in motherhood.

Releasing Expectations and Embracing Gratitude

We have expectations, expectations of ourselves, our spouses, our children, those around us. We expect that the day will unfold a certain way. We plan and prepare as best we can so that everything will get done, everyone will accomplish what they need to accomplish and things will go the way we expect.

Expectations can be good. They usually move us in the direction we want to go in. They may bring about certainty and edge us toward sanity.

But expectations can be the thief of gratitude. When we cling to these things, when we hold to them so tightly and allow ourselves to be disappointed when they are not met, we lose the opportunity to be grateful for the way things unfold in our world. We miss out on the chance to experience unexpected beauty. Things rarely go exactly as planned, no matter how much we prepare. And especially walking through this world with little ones in tow, this is even more true. And it's ok. It's perfectly ok.

Instead of allowing ourselves to be disappointed when life doesn’t roll out in front of us the way we expect, instead of feeling like something is lost, is there a way to shift our perspective? Can we instead ask what the gift is in the situation? Can we embrace gratitude for what is and look a bit deeper for the beauty?  Can we release the hold we have on our expectations and allow the universe to unfold with its own plans, letting go of how we think things should be so that we can embrace the wonder in how life actually is.

Quiet, Curiosity, and Care

My family and I recently moved from the heart of the city to the mountains. This has been a great gift to my inner life, my soul care. Most mornings I try to get out of the house before my daughter wakes up, while my husband is still sleeping or sitting with his cup of tea. I make a cup of coffee, put it in my mug and I walk out of my house into a morning wonderland. 

I walk down our little road into quiet. The trees above me are golden and the bunnies scurry across my path. The natural world stops me in in my hurried tracks, it quiets my anxious mind. The beauty of the world cares for me on days when I do not know how to care for myself. 

This morning I hiked up a familiar path near my house and came upon a group of six deer. While five of them ran quickly away, one stopped to look at me. I stood as still as possible and we took each other in for a moment. I was completely there, in that space with that beautiful creature. The world of media, politics, my never ending list of chores and work deadlines.... all of it was out of my mind. 

I walk and I listen. I walk and I wonder about the sound of a bird I have not heard before. I walk and the curiosity expands to the state of my own heart, the places and people I have forgotten to notice. 

I am reminded of a favorite poem by Wendell Berry. I am reminded that I am part of a larger story, the story of the earth and the story of humanity. Nature has this way of putting us in our place oh so gently in a way that we are nurtured and changed. 

The Peace of Wild Things
"When despair for the world grows in me
and I wake in the night at the least sound
in fear of what my life and my children’s lives may be,
I go and lie down where the wood drake
rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
I come into the peace of wild things
who do not tax their lives with forethought
of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
And I feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting with their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free."

Wendell Berry, “The Peace of Wild Things” from The Selected Poems of Wendell Berry. Copyright © 1998.

The question for each one of us lies in how to encounter this wild beauty which calls us to more quiet and curiosity. When we find it and make space for it in our lives it will change the way we listen, parent and show up in the world. It will care for us in a way that we so desperately need.  

Self Care Walk

The Importance of Self-care: What are you missing?

We care for others. That’s what we do as mothers. We care and care, but not always enough for ourselves. If we do not take care of ourselves, who will? And if we are not cared for, who can care for those we love? Self-care is not a selfish act, no, indeed it is a selfless one. But why do we run from it? Why do we prioritize everything else in front of it? Why is it so hard to embrace, to cultivate, to put into practice?

It’s not about massages and facials (though there’s nothing wrong with those). It’s not about yoga class and new clothes (though these things may be a part of it). Self care is about saying "no" often, and mindfully, consciously saying "yes". It’s about listening to yourself and understanding what it is that you truly need. Self care is about speaking kindly to yourself, it’s about giving yourself opportunities to grow and also to rest. It’s about sitting with yourself and listening to what it is that you have to say, what it is that you need to make known.

So often we as mothers put our health, our nutrition, our sleep, our creativity, our rejuvenation and our growth last. But no, no we cannot. If we do not make ourselves a priority, if we do not stand up for ourselves and understand the value of self care, then who will?

So, mama, sit with yourself. Find space and time to dial in. Tune in. Find your center and dig deep. What are you lacking? What are you needing? What are you missing in this life? Listen. And then listen some more. You are strong and resilient and so amazing. But even a fire that shines so brightly needs to be tended. If you are to be a light for those you love, you must find ways to feed yourself. So begin. This is important.

Our greatest challenges, our greatest teachers

Every day, every single day, we face challenges. We face people and places and things that feel confrontational, confusing, hard, maybe even impossible. And some of our greatest challenges come from our greatest loves. Our children push us and pull us and demand and refuse. They stand firm and then fall apart. And we are there. We catch them. But just as we’re helping them to their feet, just as we’re dusting them off, they start to push us and pull us again.

Breathe deeply mamas. These little loves of ours, these little beings, sifting through their internal world while learning to navigate the external world. It’s hard work for them. And it’s hard work for us too. On the days when they feel like our greatest challenges, know that they are also our greatest teachers.

Where else were we given a second chance to experience childhood so closely? Who else has asked us to dig down deep, oh so deep, to see what we are really made of and to show us a depth to ourselves that we never knew? And how would we ever have a chance to feel such unconditional love while being tested endlessly? Where else would we be given the opportunity to practice patience and kindness and generosity every single day? It is through practicing these things over and over that we become them.

We matter in their world. We are pivotal. And they matter so much in our world too, in more ways than we may realize. Just as the good moments fill us with love and happiness, the challenging moments fill us with growth, the chance to learn and evolve into a space we may not have seen before.

So embrace the challenges, embrace the new space these challenges open up to us. Dig deep and grow. These little teachers of ours, they are relentless and they are powerful. And even in the moments that don’t pass with ease, know that they are our greatest teachers.

Greatest Teacher

The word is “No” mama, say it with me.

The word is “No”. It’s not “Yes” or “Maybe” or “I’ll try” or “I think I can” or “Let me figure it out” or “Let me squeeze it in”. It’s “No”. Do not be afraid of it. Embrace this small, simple, strong word. So many of us are spread thin and feel like there aren’t enough hours in the day. Your are a mother; your time is valuable and your energy is valuable. The world will take as much as you will give and then ask for a bit more. And after every inch you give, it will ask for a bit more. Just a bit. Just one more thing. And then another.

There comes a time when the answer has to be “No” and there’s nothing wrong with that. Do not be afraid of it. Do not feel guilt. Use this word to guard what you have to give. Motherhood will ask so much of you, and truly it is one of the most amazing jobs in the world. And everything else will ask so much of you too. There is only so much to give, only so much to draw upon and to spread out to those around you. Guard that precious energy. Save it for the parts of life that count, the things that count, the moments that count, the ones who count.

Be intentional. Do not be afraid. The word is “No”.

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The Primal Fears of Motherhood

The human condition is part of our journey. Our ability to recognize fear in our body, mind, and intuition is rooted in our DNA. Our ability to respond to fear is optional. Fears can show up wearing different masks but can generally be reduced to three primal fears. Which of the following show up for you?

Fear of not being loved (community and connectedness)

Also known as fear of rejection or being judged. Feeling connected is a primal need. Take other mammals and even our ancestors as an example; traveling together is safer. We are stronger together. We have more skills, strengths, and support when we belong to something greater. That is, when we can negotiate through conflict and disagreements. Fear in this area can surface when our sense of belonging is threatened. For mothers, this might show up as judgement from communities, family members, other mothers.

Fear of lack of purpose (profession and higher purpose)

Bringing life into the world illumines the primal sense of purpose in a whole light.  As mothers there is a new sense of responsibility when your little one depends on you for everything. Fear of not fulfilling your divine life’s purpose for new mothers can translate to fear of your professional identity on hold. Your higher purpose may shift during the transition into motherhood. In general, with transition brings fear of the unknown.

Fear of dying (baby is thriving, survival needs met)

According to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, our most basic survival-based needs must be met in order to ascend to higher goals and aspirations. If we are concerned with where we live, eat, sleep, or if our safety is compromised we cannot act, speak, or think from a place of love. It’s stressful being an adult responsible for the needs of your children. The stress of sustaining life and providing clean, safe space might look different in modern day world than in primordial times.

So, what’s the antidote for fear?

Connect to the love you have for yourself and your baby.  Share your fears and bring them out of the shadows. Fear itself serves a purpose. It can teach us about ourselves and help us to grow. When we expose our deepest fears they no longer have the power to control our thoughts and actions. Use your tools. Whether it be meditation, yoga, dancing, breathing, singing, painting... The more we create with wild abandon, the less room fear has to occupy our subconscious.  

What yoga teaches us about duality and the importance of AND.

It’s inevitable. Duality shows up our lives through our emotions, nature, circumstance, energy and thoughts. Bringing a child into this world is both challenging and incredible, exhausting and euphoric. Stepping into motherhood is no different. In fact, parenting might be the most intense reflection of the highest highs and lowest lows.

Yoga is not the practice for maintaining the high, but rather oscillating between the two with grace and compassion. Practicing yoga does not make you a better mother, but rather gives you the tools to trust yourself.  

You need not choose between anything. You are a living, breathing, human caring for another living breathing human. There is an AND.  AND gives us permission to experience the [emotion, circumstance, environment, condition]. In the same moment you might be grateful for this little being AND frustrated that they don’t sleep, blessed with the gift of life AND stressed from daily demands, totally in love with your baby AND mourning your former freedom. These feelings carry information, offering awareness and opportunities for acceptance.  Damage happens when we deny our experience. You are not alone.

Power thoughts for coping with duality:

  1. This [emotion, circumstance, environment, condition] is temporary.

  2. Like nature, I am always changing, growing and molting. I give myself permission to release old identities to create way for new ones.

  3. I honor my spectrum of emotions as an emblem of being alive.

  4. I am not alone

Share about a time when you experienced an ‘AND’ in your life.  

The Emotions of Motherhood: the highs AND the lows

Some things you cannot go around or over. You must go through. Some things you must let wash over you so you can truly release them. Let yourself feel all of the feels. In fact, embrace them, don’t run from them. Sit with your tears and let them turn to sobs if they need to. Feel your disappointment and don’t talk yourself out of it. It’s ok. Look at your fears. Turn them over in your mind and sift through them. What are they really? Go deeper. Sadness and grief, without them how would we truly understand the gift of the good times. Feel the opposites. Allow yourself to experience the highs and lows, soak in the moments in between.

It’s so easy to shut out the bad and to turn away from struggle. But as much as the happy times in motherhood make up our lives, as much as the joys become our defining moments, the hard times do as well. Don’t run, don’t hide, don’t ignore or shut out. These are real. And this is living.

This week allow yourself to feel emotions as they come up, the hard ones too. Let them be real. Let them wash over you so you can truly let them go.

The Art of Mindful Listening: Finding presence in motherhood

What is mindful listening?

Mindful listening is a meditation tool to enhance your awareness and reduce stress by observing sound without judgement.  As moms, we are skilled at multi-tasking and while this may serve us occasionally, we risk the ability to be fully present. True listening requires your total attention; whether it be listening to the needs of your baby, your partner, co-worker, friend or family member. Then, there’s taking time to listen to yourself.  Think of all the distractions in your world that prevent you from fully listening to your own needs, desires and inner guidance. Mindful listening is just one practice to guide you towards living in the present.

Did you know?

Music is temporal;  meaning it happens over time and changes from one moment to the next. As a result, music is an accessible aid to any mindfulness practice.

Put it into practice:

  • Choose a song you’ve never heard and listen to it all the way through. Notice the lyrics if any, name all the instruments you detect, reflect on your experience by identifying an overall tone or theme of the song.

  • Choose a song you love and observe emotions it sparks.  Notice where in your body you feel tension or other sensations.

  • Try breathing for the duration of a song lying on the ground with your eyes closed.

  • Pause for a moment to observe your surroundings  (i.e. birds chirping, traffic outside, wind chimes) without judging or labeling what you hear, simply practice awareness.

  • Each time you hear an action based sound (i.e. baby cries, alarms, cell phones) take just beat to observe the quality of sound and where you feel it in your body before reacting.

  • Try humming and listen to your own voice vibrate from the inside out. Vibration (music) is a quick way to drop into a meditation practice. It doesn’t have to be long. A few rounds of humming can have a profound effect on calming your nervous system.

Seed & Song: Elevating motherhood one breath at a time

If you are longing for something to exist, you should create it. Seed & Song is a dream project of three women. We are mothers, yoga teachers and music therapists.

A year and a half ago, right in the middle of mothering tiny people and watching so many women in our community making the transition into motherhood, we began to long for a place to catch our breaths, an authentic space to nurture our children and ourselves. Seed & Song was born out of this need.

We have drawn on our years of collective experience in using music to support development, song writing, teaching yoga, and finding our own breathe and voice through yoga and meditation to create Seed & Song.

We have created a unique yoga class for moms and babies accompanied by original music designed to cultivate development and engagement for the babies while supporting the yoga poses and flow for moms. We are delighted to be able to invite you to become part of this completely new program and community.

Watch this video to learn a bit more about who we are and what we do!